Today’s Quote

May 2, 2017
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Today’s Quote

April 13, 2017

“Historical mythmaking is made possible only by forgetting. We have to begin, then, with the first refusal to face reality: most colonizing schemes that took root in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century British America were built on privilege and subordination, not any kind of proto-democracy. The generation of 1776 certainly underplayed that fact. And all subsequent generations took their cue from the nation’s founders.”

Quote from page 5 of the Introduction to White Trash.

Today’s Gag?

July 15, 2016

TRUMP:BlogClick image to enlarge. (This is a repost from 3/22/16) To buy reprint rights for this cartoon, visit my archives at cartoonstock.com, and jantoo.com. You may also have this cartoon reproduced on mugs, t-shirts and other products. Here’s the link: http://www.zazzle.com/

Copyright © 2016 Jim Sizemore.

Today’s Quote

May 25, 2016

th“Even if one assumed that God was the source of all political authority, did that mean that every king, tyrant or inferior magistrate, every highwayman or pirate who tried to exert his power over his victims, did so with divine approval and could reasonably expect them to believe that it was sacrilegious to resist? Clearly we obey kings for reasons which are different to those we give for obeying robbers who hold us in their power.”

David Hume, the Philosopher as Historian, by Nicholas Phillipson


Today’s Quote

February 17, 2016

ron-chernow-1“From the outset, the young Hamilton had phenomenal stamina for sustained work; ambitious, orphaned boys do not enjoy the option of idleness. Even before starting work, he must have developed unusual autonomy for a thirteen-year-old . . . Hamilton exuded an air of crisp efficiency and cool self-command. While his peers squandered their time on frivolities, Hamilton led a much more strenuous, urgent life that was to liberate him for St. Croix . . . He was a proud and sensitive boy, caught in the lower reaches of a rigid class society with small chance for social mobility.”

Ron Chernow, author of Alexander Hamilton

Penguin Books, 2004


Today’s Quotes

October 5, 2015

BookCover220From note 16, Chapter III: American Scripture, Making the Declaration of Independence, by Pauline Maier

“With regard to the values and educational methods of the eighteenth century, note that Jefferson himself kept a ‘Commonplace Book.’ Its pedagogical purpose was suggested by Jefferson’s teacher, the Rev. James Maury, who instructed his own son to ‘reflect, and remark on, and digest what you read,’ and to dwell on any remarkable beauties of diction, justness or sublimity of sentiment, or masterly strokes of true wit which may occur in the course of your reading.”

From note 97, Chapter IV: American Scripture, Making the Declaration of Independence, by Pauline Maier

“At Chicago, Lincoln . . . said that the argument that the principles of the Declaration of Independence do not apply to blacks was identical to ‘the pauline-maierarguments that kings have made for enslaving the people in all ages of the world. You will find that all the arguments in favor of king-craft were of this class.’ Douglas’s argument was like that of ‘the same old serpent’ who says ‘you work and I eat, you toil and I will enjoy the fruits of it. Turn it whatever way you will—whether it come from the mouth of a King, an excuse for enslaving people of his country, or from the mouth of men of one race as a reason for enslaving the men of another race, it all the same old serpent . . . .”


Today’s Quote

February 9, 2015

John Adams

From American Scripture, Making the Declaration of Independence, By Pauline Maier

Adams, J” . . . . the committee appointed Mr. Jefferson and me, to draw them (i.e., the ‘Articles’) up in form, and cloath them in a proper Dress. The Sub Committee met, and considered the Minutes, making such Observations on them as then occured: when Mr. Jefferson desired me to take them to my Lodgings and make the Draught. This I declined and gave several reasons for declining. 1. That he was a Virginian and I a Massachusettensian. 2. that he was a southern Man and I a northern one. 3. That I had been so obnoxious for my early and constant Zeal in promoting the Measure, that any draught of mine, would undergo a more severe Scrutiny and Criticism in Congress, than one of his composition. 4thly and lastly that would be reason enough if there were no other, I had great Opinion of the Elegance of his pen and none at all of my own . . . He accordingly took the Minutes  and in a day or two produced to me his Draught . . . “