Photo Quote

July 2, 2010

“A good photograph will prove to the viewer how little our eyes permit us to see. Most people only see what they’ve always seen and what they expect to see. Whereas a photographer, if he’s good, will see everything.”

Leon Levinstein, 1910-1988


Photo Quote

May 28, 2010

“I guess I’ve shot about 40,000 negatives and

of these I have about 800 pictures I like.”

Harry Callahan, 1912-1999


Photo Quote

May 21, 2010

“The subject matter is so much more

important than the photographer.”

Gordon Parks, 1912-2006


Photo Quote

April 9, 2010

“I have never taken a picture for any other reason than that

at that moment it made me happy to do so.”

Jacques-Henri Lartigue, 1894-1986


Photo Quote

November 28, 2009

CapaGerSol

“If your pictures aren’t good enough,

you aren’t close enough.”

Robert Capa, 1913-1954
Magnum Photos


Photo Quote

November 14, 2009

BruceD-vote

“Most of my pictures are compassionate, gentle and personal.

They tend to let the viewer see for himself.

They tend not to preach.

And they tend not to pose as art.”

Bruce Davidson, born 1933
Image: Magnum Photos



Photo Quote

November 7, 2009

Arbus1:blog

“I really believe there are things nobody would

see if I didn’t photograph them.”

Diane Arbus, 1923-1971

National Archives, Records of the Social Security Administration

Did You Know . . .

May 28, 2009

NewYorker2

The illustrator/photographer/graphic designer Jorge Colombo created the cover of this week’s New Yorker (June 1, 2009 issue) by drawing with his finger on his iPhone. Brilliant first. Neat trick. Wish I’d thought of it first. But on the other hand, I don’t even own an iPhone. (Click image for a larger view.)

Copyright © 2009 Jim Sizemore.


Hands

April 13, 2009

boa1

garybase1

clown1

elbert1

If you’re an artist, or have ever tried to become one, you know that the part of the human body hardest to draw is the hand. You can always spot an artist-wannabe when they present “finished art” wherein the hands of the people are hidden in some way—either in pockets, behind backs, under the table, etc., etc. A confident artist, on the other hand (sorry, couldn’t resist it), doesn’t hide hands because he or she has, to at least some degree, mastered their depiction. Actually, the skillful artist loves to draw hands because they know that after the human face, hands are the most expressive parts of the body, especially when it comes to gestures. On the other other hand, some newbie artists give up the game in frustration once they discover the difficulty of drawing hands. Many of those creative folks become photographers instead—as did Yours Truly, at least for a time. Or they try their own hands at cartooning (ditto), where the graphic standards are much lower, especially these days. (See my own limited efforts on this blog, and the many crudely drawn “Post Modern” gag examples in the New Yorker. BTW, the term “Post Modern,” as I understand how it applies to cartooning, means crudely drawn on purpose. The idea is to make an up to date graphic statement “against” professional slickness. Meanwhile, I’ve spent many years trying to become professionally slick. It’s all very confusing.)

Copyright © 2009 Jim Sizemore.