Mr. Five

July 18, 2008

On May 17, soon after I started this blog, and in response to a request I made for reader doodle submissions, I received one by cartoonist Rick Parker depicting a Schrek-like figure up to his chest in liquid and holding a sign with the number 9 on it. In his note Rick explained that his idea while doodling the image was to imagine what a number would look like if it were a person. Clever concept, I thought. Loved the image and posted it. A bit later Rick sent along the number 5 guy, above. I think he’s even cuter than Mr. 9. You don’t have to be a professional like Rick to have a favorite doodle published on my blog. Just send the doodle to me attached to an email. Anyone? My email address is: jimscartoons@aol.com

Rick Parker is a hyper-talented professional cartoonist best known as the artist of MTV’s Beavis and Butt-Head Comic Book. He was also on staff at Marvel Comics for many years and did lettering and production work in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently, he’s drawing the Introductory pages featuring the “Old Witch,” “The Vault Keeper “and “The Crypt Keeper” for Jim Salicrup’s new release of Tales From The Crypt, published by PaperCutz. Rick also teaches comic art in the New Jersey public and private school systems and has conducted classes in comic strip creation and seminars at the Newark Museum. You can see examples of his professional work by clicking on his link in the “Blogroll” or “Cartoons” sidebar boxes.


And the Default Winner Is . . .

May 17, 2008

Doodle Challenge Results

Some of us will recall that this current spate of “doddlemania” began way back on May 7, 2008, as a result of a request I made at the end of my first-ever blog post—the one titled “Doodlemeister.com Loves Doodles.” In my closing note that day I asked for submissions of a favorite doodle of your own. That first post drew 12 comments, but only one person entered the contest. (Not that it was really a contest, but, rather, more of a call for entries for a possible exhibition. If I received any doodles I pledged to post some of the best ones once I figured out how to do it.) Rick Parker was the only mother’s son (forgive the cliché but I’m still in my Mother’s Day mode) who came through for me. And a very nice guy he is, judging by our brief email exchange. In one of his missives he was even nice enough to gently point out that I had made the old “i” “e” transposition error in my logo doodle and throughout the post, thus demonstrating my highly refined knack for misspelling anything, even the title of my very own brand new blog. (That’s my own analysis, being a good guy Rick didn’t say that right out.)

As you see, Rick’s doodle shows a Schrek-like figure standing (sitting?) up to his chest in some sort of liquid (water? milk? molasses?). But why is he holding that sign? And what’s the number nine signify? I was intrigued. In his brief note Rick explained that his idea was to imagine what a number would look like if it were a person. Clever concept, I thought, and it instantly occurred to me that you could do the same thing with letters. For example, how would a capital letter “B” person appear? Or, for that matter, a lowercase “b” person? There’s no end to the possibilities, of course, especially with numbers; you could start with zero and work your way up into the primes. You’d have enough material to last thousands of lifetimes! I love it when a doodle gets me going like this, or, as my mother liked to say, “sets me to thinkin’.”

As far as I know, Rick didn’t exploit his concept beyond the Number Nine Person he came up with back in ’93, the one we see above. (Note to Rick: When (if) you read this, let us know what you planned—cartoon feature? comic strip? children’s book? illustrated card deck?—and did you get any farther than your very cool Mr. Schrekadoodle? As my mother would say, “We sure would like to hear from you on that subject.”

I copied this bit of Rick’s bio from his blog: Probably best known as the artist of MTV’s Beavis and Butt-Head Comic Book. I was also on staff at Marvel Comics for many years and did lettering and production work in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Currently drawing the Introductory pages featuring the Old Witch, The Vault Keeper and the Crypt Keeper for Jim Salicrup’s new release of Tales From The Crypt published by PaperCutz. I also teach comic art in the public and private school systems and have conducted classes in comic strip creation and seminars at the Newark Museum.

You can find the link to rick’s cartoon blog in the sidebar under “cartoons” and “blogroll.” Copyright © 2008 Jim Sizemore.